Z Stack and Zelenko Protocols for COVID-19: Review (November 2021)

The Zelenko COVID-19 Protocols was developed by Dr Vladimir Zelenko. The protocol has as its centerpiece, but not exclusive piece, the combined use of Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and Zinc as a means by which a person can both help to prevent or mitigate the contraction of COVID-19, or can actually treat the disease once it has been diagnosed. 

retrospective study analyzing Dr Zelenko's patient data was accepted for publication after a rigorous peer review process. The study finds that early intervention and treatment of high-risk patients with COVID-19 resulted in significantly fewer hospitalizations and deaths. The treatment consisting of zinc, low-dose hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), and azithromycin, is also referred to as "The Zelenko Protocol." Dr Zelenko has since updated his protocols to incorporate new evidence.

He has since evolved his protocols to include a quercetin, zinc, vitamin D and C protocol for low-risk patients as well as guidelines for COVID-19 prevention. 
Z STACK Zelenko
In an effort to make it easier for patients, Dr Zelenko has developed an oral supplement that contains all four key ingredients: vitamin C, quercetin, vitamin D3 and zinc. It’s referred to as 'Z-Stack Supplement'.

Z-Stack Vitamin cocktail provides key ingredients needed in order to help your body fight off this deadly invader. 

The cost of the Z-STACK vitamin cocktail is $55 per bottle for a one month supply. 

zelenko protocol

Zelenko COVID-19 Prophylaxis Protocol

The Zelenko prophylaxis protocol is sub-divided into:
  1. Prevention Protocol for Low and Moderate Risk Patients
  2. Prevention Protocol for High Risk Patients
Prophylaxis is an action taken to prevent or protect against a specified disease. Greek in origin, from the word "phylax", meaning "to guard" and "watching." 
  
Low Risk Patients 

Young healthy people do not need prophylaxis against COVID-19. In young and healthy people, this infection causes mild cold-like symptoms. It is advantageous for these patients to be exposed to Covid-19, build up their antibodies and have their immune system clear the virus. This will facilitate the development of herd immunity and help prevent future Covid-19 pandemics. However, if these patients desire prophylaxis against Covid-19, then they should take the protocol noted below. 

Moderate Risk Patients 

Patients from this category are healthy but have high potential viral-load exposure. This group includes medical personnel, caregivers of high-risk patients, people who use public transportation, first responders and other essential personnel who are crucial to the continued functioning of society. These patients should be encouraged to take prophylaxis against Covid-19 in accordance with the protocol noted below. 

High Risk Patients 

Patients are considered high risk if they are over the age of 45, or if they are younger than 45 but they have co-morbidities, that is, they have other health conditions that put them at risk. These patients have between a 5 to 10% mortality rate if they are infected with COVID-19. These patients should be strongly encouraged to take prophylaxis against COVID-19 in accordance with the protocol noted below.

Protocol for Low and Moderate Risk Patients: 

If Quercetin is unavailable, then use Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) 400mg 1 time a day  (J. Agric. Food Chem. 2014

Protocol for High Risk Patients:
Zelenko vs FLCCC I-MASK+ protocol for prevention

In addition to what is recommended by the zelenko protocol, the FLCCC I-MASK+ prevention protocol includes mouthwash, melatonin and ivermectin as part of the prevention protocol. However, the I-MASK+ prevention protocol does not categorise the patients into low risk or high risk and does not include hydroxychloroquine. For the zelenko protocol, hydroxychloroquine is only recommended for those in high risk category.

Clinical evidence to date has reported promising results for Ivermectin in prevention, early treatment as well as late treatment for COVID-19. While both Ivermectin and Hydroxychloroquine might be useful for early treatment, Ivermectin has a broader potential benefit i.e. prevention, early treatment as well as late treatment / hospital treatment.

Can hydroxychloroquine and ivermectin be used together? The 2 drugs do not seem to have a between-drug interaction. However, no in vitro or in vivo studies have been conducted on the combined effect of HCQ and ivermectin on COVID-19 infection. 

Quercetin is a viable stand-in, if you simply cannot get hydroxychloroquine or ivermectin. Quercetin works best when taken with vitamin C and Bromelain, as vitamin C helps activate it and bromelain helps with the absorption. Do not forget to combine it with zinc.

Although ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine are relatively safe drugs, they are still synthetic chemicals that can have side effects. Quercetin and Vitamin D, C, Zinc are nutrients that your body require for optimal health. Nutrients are safer alternatives especially if your risk is low e.g. age below 50 and no other chronic illness. Discuss with your doctor on the benefit vs risk for each treatment. If you are on multiple medications, be aware of supplement-drug interactions that might enhance the possibilities of adverse effects.

Zelenko Protocol - Treatment Plan for Patients with COVID-19 symptoms

Fundamental Principles (Dr Zelenko Protocol When to Start)

Treat patients based on clinical suspicion as soon as possible, preferably within the first 5 days of symptoms. Perform PCR testing, but do not withhold treatment pending results.

Patient Categories

Low risk patient - Younger than 45, no co-morbidities, and clinically stable
High risk patient - Older than 45, younger than 45 with co-morbidities, or clinically unstable

Treatment Options

Low risk patients - over the counter options:


1. Elemental Zinc 50mg 1 time a day for 7 days (PubMed) (Amazon)

2.1. Quercetin 500mg 2 times a day for 7 days (PubMed) (AmazonOR

2.2. Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) 400mg 1 time a day for 7 days (J. Agric. Food Chem. 2014)

3. Vitamin C 1000mg 1 time a day for 7 days (Amazon)
4. Vitamin D3 5000iu 1 time a day for 7 days (Amazon)


Moderate / High risk patients
  • Elemental Zinc 50-100mg once a day for 7 days (Amazon)
  • Vitamin C 1000mg 1 time a day for 7 days (Amazon)
  • Vitamin D3 10000iu once a day for 7 days or 50000iu once a day for 1-2 days (Amazon)
  • Azithromycin 500mg 1 time a day for 5 days or
  • Doxycycline 100mg 2 times a day for 7 days
  • Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) 200mg 2 times a day for 5-7 days (ScienceDirect) and/or
  • Ivermectin 0.4-0.5mg/kg/day for 5-7 days (ivmmeta.com). Either or both HCQ and IVM can be used, and if one only, the second agent may be added after about 2 days of treatment if obvious recovery has not yet been observed etc. (Find a Doctor)
If HCQ (hydroxychloroquine) is not available, Quercetin 500mg 3 times a day for 7 days OR EGCG 400mg 2 times a day for 7 days.

Both protocols can be viewed from his website.

Note on Zinc supplements: 
  • How much zinc you should take per day depends on the type and forms of zinc, as each supplement contains a different amount of 'elemental zinc'. The percentage of elemental zinc varies by form. 
  • For example, approximately 23% of zinc sulfate consists of elemental zinc; thus, 220 mg of zinc sulfate contains 50 mg of elemental zinc (Ref). Zinc picolinate (20% of elemental zinc), zinc ascorbate (15%), zinc chloride (48%), zinc carbonate (52%), zinc citrate (31%), zinc bisglycinate (25%) (Ref) and zinc gluconate (14%) and zinc oxide (80%) (Ref).
  • Zinc sulfate​ is an inorganic form of zinc. Inorganic zinc is not as effective or useable by your body as chelated zinc sources. The best form of zinc is one that's chelated to ensure absorbability. 
  • Zinc gluconate​ and zinc glycinate are some of the popular chelated forms of over-the-counter supplements. Zinc acetate is the best zinc supplement to treat the ​common cold​. Findings of a study published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases in 2017 recommended using acetate lozenges within 24 hours of the onset of a cold for a three-fold increase in the rate of recovery.
Zelenko vs FLCCC I-MASK+ protocol for treatment

In addition to what is recommended by the zelenko protocol, the FLCCC I-MASK+ treatment protocol includes mouthwash, melatonin and ivermectin and incorporates repurposed and newer agents like anti-androgens (spironolactone, finasteride and dutasteride), fluvoxamine and monoclonal antibodies as part of the treatment protocol. The I-MASK+ treatment protocol also categorises the treatment agents into first line agents and second line agents for those who do not respond to first line agents and for those high risk patients with co-morbidities.

Many successful studies utilised both ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine in combination. Further, the Zelenko protocol recommends that both hydroxychoroquine and ivermectin can be used together, especially for high risk patients. If you have started with only one, the second agent may be added after about 2 days of treatment if obvious recovery has not yet been observed.


 

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Dr. Zelenko's Z-Stack Vitamin Cocktail: Review 2021

17 Best Supplements to Reduce Cytokine Storm, a Severe Complication from COVID-19 (November 2021)

NAC vs NAD vs NR vs Niacin vs NMN: What Are the Differences?

Zinc Gluconate vs Zinc Picolinate: What's the Difference?

Glutathione vs NAC: What's the Difference? (November 2021)

Black Seed and COVID-19: Australian Researchers found Nigella Sativa may help in treatment for COVID-19 infection

Best Orthopedic Doctors in Malaysia 2021

Black Seed Oil 101: Here's What You Need to Know (November 2021)

Z-Stack for Kids: Review (November 2021)